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Carb Free, Fat Free….

One of the subjects we talked about at yesterdays workshop was nutrition, and diet fads.

Let’s start with Fat Free.

In the mid 70′s heart disease was a big problem.  So after some research the issue was found to be too much fat in peoples diet.  This is when the recommendation to eat less fat started, so what happened?

Heart disease went down, but people got fat.

The trouble was removing the fat from foods makes them taste bland, so to keep those foods in production since that’s what everyone wanted we got fat-free versions that replaced the fat with sugars (carbs) to get them tasting good again.

So now we’ve realized that carbs are what makes people fat, so those have become the new enemy for dieters.

The trouble wasn’t “fats” though, it was certain types of fats.  Fats are a required part of your diet, they are a necessity in your body absorbing certain vitamins and provide long term energy as your body processes them slower then carbs.

That said, their is a difference between cooking food in bacon fat vs Olive Oil (Also a fat).  Omega-3, Omega-6… things foods are now advertising as containing are fats.

Anyways, carbs are the same.  We need them.  There is something called a ketogenic diet which is basically carb free and can cause a lot of weight loss…. calling it a healthy way to eat however…

What has really caused us trouble is the high amount of processed food we eat.  And, coincidentally a lot of that processed food is carb based.

Broccoli, bananas, apples, carrots… those are carbs.  Sugar and high fructose corn syrup are as well.

If you want a decent way of looking at carbs and whether they are good or bad the “GI Index” is a good place to start.

It measures how fast your body absorbs a specific food.  If you absorb it too fast your blood sugar spikes causing your body to release insulin.  Insulin combines with blood sugar to store it as body fat and get your blood sugar back down.

With some processed foods it spikes it faster then we are really meant to deal with, insulin is released in high levels storing it and then your blood sugar falls bellow where it should be.  When your blood sugar gets low your brain gives you a craving for sweet foods to get it back up.  End result is weight gain.

Food should be plant or animal, thats what we are designed to eat.  The farther it gets processed away from that the worse it likely is for you.

To close here is a very simple rule to judge if you should eat something.  If it is mostly carbohydrate, but no fibre, it’s probably a bad idea.  Fibre and sugars are almost always food together in nature, unless the fibre is removed in processing.  Fibre helps your body regulate the speed it absorbs sugars, without it things get absorbed faster then they should.

Martial Arts School Culture pt 2: Who Serves Who?

The next part of culture I want to talk about is who serves who.

In the martial arts it’s not uncommon to put the head of the school or organization up on a pedestal.  They get their picture on the wall, the picture gets bowed too, you aren’t supposed to speak to them unless spoken too.  We even had a guy in the city that had students “volunteering” to go out and build his on temple in the religion he started with him at the top…

This is very contradictory to so much of the traditional values of the martial arts.  “Samurai” translates roughly to “one who serves”, humility has always been a core belief in martial arts from all over the world.

Our goal is to be accessible, human, and to be here to serve your needs, not the other way around.

So if you want to know who the master is at our school is, it’s the students.  The white belts.  The person that just stepped through the door for the first time.  We are here to help you get better, to use our experience to serve you.

And it is our hope that one day many of our students will also be able to serve others by sharing their experience.

In the words of Albert Einstein “Only a life lived for others is a life worthwhile”

Keep following our blog for more thoughts on our schools culture

Safety in Fitness: Strength Training

Today I want to talk a little about fitness programs, and the safety factor involved.

Now people train for very different reasons, and that is something that needs to be taken into account.  A body builder is going to have a very different training routine then a power lifter, or olympic lifter despite the fact that they are all weight training sports.  It’s no different then a sprinter vs a marathon runner.

The other side of this is where strength training is done, not for competition within strength training, but as a supplement to other activities.  In this case the goal is not necessarily to get bigger, lift as much as possible, but rather the prevent injury in other activities.

For us our fitness program is just that.  It started as a way to get our members in great shape and prevent injuries.

We are not a kickboxing themed aerobics class, and we will never run that in our facility.  Our program is a athletic Strength and conditioning program, designed to get people in shape in a way that makes them strong, lean, agile and resistant to injury.

This effects the way we train, and explains a lot of why we do things the way we do.

As an example of what I mean, in “real life” be it sports, martial arts or simply shovelling your drive way, strength is rarely applied equally from both sides straight on as it is in a weight lifting environment.  It is applied with movement, and rotation plays a big part of it.

So this is reflected in the way that we train.  Too often athletes and non-athletes try to rely on body building or powerlifting exercises alone.  And while these exercises are great and can be very beneficial the body works the way you train it.  If you train everything in 1 dimensional motions its hardly surprising that when you apply that strength in a 3-dimensional “real world” activity it can lead to injury.

It’s sort of like putting a race car engine in a car without steering, breaks and balance to go with it.  Too much power without those and you’re going to crash. An F-1 car is a amazing vehicle… unless you take it off-roading.

Learn more about our fitness program here: http://www.innovativema.ca/fitness-program/

 

Balance in Strength Training

This is a pretty simple concept in Strength training, but one that is easy to neglect, so I wanted to take a minute to look at a couple of ideas.

The first is that muscle groups work opposite each other.  For example your biceps bend your arm and your triceps extend your arm.  Or rather one set pushes, the other pulls.

Balancing push / pull exercises is very important in preventing injury and maintaining a healthy body.  If one group gets disproportionately strong in relation to it’s opposing group it’s only a matter of time before something gets injured.

The second concept is that outside of a gym environment most “real world” activities are not straight pushes or pulls, but involve rotation.  Throwing a ball, swinging a bat / golf club or even shovelling the driveway are rotational movements where one side pushes, the other pulls.

Again, this is a common cause of injury if the muscles involved are not trained for this.  So not only do pushing and pulling exercises need to be balanced, but training those muscles to work in more dynamic situations is also important for injury prevention.

And the third part of this is stabilization muscles.  Or rather the muscles that help stabilize you’re main muscles as they do heavy work.  To see what I mean compare doing a pushup on the floor vs with your hands on a exercise balls or a suspension set up (gymnastic rings, TRX, etc.)

Imagine taking a race car engine and sticking it in a economy car without upgrading the tires, steering, breaks and weight distribution… It’s a crash waiting to happen.

Same thing when training, a large number of injuries come from not properly training those stabilization muscles.  This is one of the biggest problems of using machines for strength, they take the stabilization aspects out.

Make sure to attend our free workshop on Feb 20th, 2017 for more important nutrition and fitness tips: http://www.innovativema.ca/student/signup.php?type=02-2017-HFW-1030am

Martial Arts School Culture pt 1 – Titles

Martial arts schools all tend to have their own unique culture, just like most places do.  In the martial arts world sometimes things can get a little… “overboard” at times.

We’ve tried to keep our school culture healthy and in the next few articles I want to look at a few pieces of culture and why we choose to do things the way we do.

I guess the first thing to acknowledge is there is no single right way on any of these things.  Just preferences and how they fit into the larger picture of the culture of a school.

The other thing to keep in mind is that martial arts has had a impact on the entertainment industry, but that influence goes both ways.  Some of which are good… others not so much.

So, first topic:  Titles

And boy does the martial arts world love titles.  For a community that stresses the importance of humility some of it seems a little out of place.

In the west we generally had “coach”, “instructor”, etc.  In Japan it would be “sensei”, which isn’t a title as much as a honorific, more like Mr, Ms, Mrs, etc but used towards someone in a higher position.  Teachers, doctors, lawyers and other positions of authority.  Roughly translated as “born before”, or more along the lines of a way to refer to someone who has experience and is passing that along.

Anyways, other languages have similar words (shifu, euro,  sah buh nim, etc)

But at some point in the 50′s / 60′s we started getting some serious title inflation…

I am not “Master Andrew”, never will be.  language plays a part in how we view things, and I am not anyones master.  Just a coach, that’s what I do.  I try to make people better at martial arts.

To put it in context suppose you or your child joined a soccer team and the coach introduced himself as “Grandmaster Joe” and wanted the players to call him that… it would seem a little odd.

Some schools try to keep a “mystic” element to what they do, putting high ranking people as capable of inhuman feats like they are in the movies.  But, we are all just humans, even the most experienced martial artist is still human.  They can’t really run up walls, or blast you with chi from across the room.

Even if someone can be said to have reached a mastery level of skill, calling them “Master Bob” in the martial arts seems as strange as calling a master carpenter “Master Stan”.

The other thing that we have is language related, but also adds some confusion.  For example the term “Professor” gets used in some styles.  In the native language “professor” means teacher, and is used at all levels.  However in English it has a very specific meaning.

Language and context matter, and in English in Canada we have perfectly suitable words.  I suspect people would give me a puzzled look if I used the term “Doctor” a title for teaching martial arts, however in Rome “Doctore” was the term used for the person training gladiators.

It’s sometimes marketing, sometimes ego and sometimes a sort of cultural appropriation.

What makes it more interesting is that when Kung fu went to Japan and karate was formed, it took on Japanese terms.  When Korea was occupied and Karate went into Korea, it took on Korean terms.  When Judo went to Brazil it took on a lot of Portuguese terms.

Yet for some reason in English speaking places we feel using foreign words gives credibility.

Funny little piece of trivia.  In Japanese a front was “Mae Geri”, a side kick being “Yoko geri”, etc.  The word for kick being “geri”, except context matters and on it’s own it does not mean kick, but poop.  Without something in front the word should be “keri”, not “geri”.  So we spent a lot of time practicing our poops until someone informed us of what was getting said :D

For our school we choose to go with first names, or if the child prefers “coach” is also good. Misusing another languages terms is something I’ve seen enough of in the martial arts, and I think it’s a little disrespectful to people that actually speak those languages to be butchering them constantly.

 

 

14 tips on getting hired as a teenager

I’ve gotten to hire multiple teenagers, and for what I would consider pretty good jobs.  I am in a industry that tends to hire teens frequently, and have discussed the matter with many others that employee teens many times.

So why post this on a martial arts blog?  Well, we train with and hire teens, and we want the best employees we can get :)

So, how would I recommend a teenager get their first (or second) job?

1 – Personality matters.  More then anything else in a lot of cases.  In the business world this is called being a “culture fit”.  It is easy to teach a person technical skills, much harder to teach them to be a good and motivated person.  When in a group do you tend to elevate the group or slow it down by being a distraction?  If something needs done do you do it, or ignore it until someone else does it?

2 – Any job pays you for the value you bring.  If you bring more value, you can ask for more money in return.  If you need to be constantly managed and given direction, you’re not going to get very far.  In any business a employee has to be worth more in value to that business then they get paid.  Otherwise you aren’t a good investment.

3 – The ability to work with anyone on anything is a huge value.  Someone that bickers and gossips with others… they are a poison to a workplace and won’t get very far.

4 – Your network is important.  Jobs often come as a result of who you know, not just what you know.  Again, technical skills are easy to teach, but a being a jerk is a hard thing to fix.  Most employers will choose to hire someone they know, or someone that is recommended by someone they trust over a unknown.  References on a resume are there for this reason.   But a personal recommendation from someone trusted will carry more weight then most references.  It’s just the way we are wired, people will look at reviews for a movie, but a critics reviews will fall second to a friends recommendation.

5 – Everything you do matters.  We live in a social media world, and employers will check you out.  If we pull up your profile and see something we don’t like, that’s a hit against you.  If you’re friends list looks like a bunch of drug dealers you’re not getting the job.  On the flip side, if you’re profile is good that’s points for you.

6 – Have hobbies.  Seriously, have hobbies.  And Call of Duty and flipping water bottles doesn’t count.  School is important, but if all you do is what everyone else does you are just like everyone else.  No one wants to hire a boring person.  Every job I’ve gotten from the time I was 16 has been because of things I did outside of school.  Between about 11-16 most people drop out of things, Be the one that doesn’t and you’ll be thankful you didn’t and possibly land a great job as a result.  Even if it’s completely unrelated to the job, I got a software job  and one of the differentiating factors was that I did martial arts and the “other guy” had no active hobbies.

7 – There is nothing wrong with working at McDonalds or other big chains.  In fact, it’s a great idea.  Big Chains have something important down.  Business systems.  McDonalds is basically the text book case for developing solid business systems.  Spending some time learning how companies that can scale to that size manage day-to-day operations is a great experience.

8 – If you want a good job, go for it.  If you want a job that requires specific skills and is more rewarding, go for it.  Earn that job.  Just because you are young doesn’t mean you can’t get a job that makes you feel valuable.  The youngest I’ve ever hired someone was at 14, and that was to help teach.  They didn’t show up with a resume out of the blue one day, they’d been training with me for a few years, they’d come early to work with the younger kids regularly.  Get out and be involved in things and more skilled jobs are there if you look for them.

9 – Sales is a universal skill.  From selling yourself as a potential employee to selling products or services to selling a proposal in a office job, sales skills are universal.  If you understand sales you can succeed in most environments.  If you want to sell anything you have to be trustworthy, likeable, helpful, professional and know what you are talking about.

10 – Know your strengths and weaknesses.  A job will go well if it is both something you like doing, and something you are good at.  It needs both to work.  A job that is a bad fit for you isn’t going to do you or the employer any good.

11 – Go after the job you want.  There is a time to plaster your resume out everywhere you can find, but make sure it’s positions you actually want.  And the ones you want, make sure the employees knows you want “that” job, not just any job anywhere as long as it pays you.  For me if I am hiring a instructor, I don’t want to hire someone because they just need a paycheque.  I want to hire someone that wants to teach martial arts, loves working with kids and believes in what we do and how we do it.  Same goes for any employer.

12 – Develop skills in the area you want to work.  It’s never too early. So many successful people started on the path that got them to that success when they where really young.  It’s just like having hobbies, if you want to stand out as the best person to hire, you have to bring something that goes above what everyone else does.

13 – Don’t be easily  replaceable.  If you do get a job and want to keep it, don’t be easy to replace.  Some jobs take a couple hours training and you’re in action… if all you bring is the minimum required you can be replaced as easy as changing a lightbulb.  Going above and beyond the basic expectations makes you much harder to replace and is what leads to advancement and promotions.

14 – Be reliable.  One of the biggest concerns a lot of employers have regarding younger employers is reliability.  Showing up late for a shift, calling in sick regularly, showing up with other things on your mind that interfere with doing your job.  Pretty much every reference call I’ve done for someone their potential employees asks about their reliability and attendance.  This might mean hitting deadlines, or simply being at work, ready to go and on time overtime.  If you work for a business that business depends on you.

 

Birthdays, Birthdays and more Birthdays…

That’s been the theme of things lately… something happened and our birthday parties have gone nuts.  We started doing these a couple years back for students and didn’t really make a big deal of it.

Martial art celebration

Then suddenly we started getting non-students wanting to do parties here, usually because they had attended one for someone else.

Now a weekend without a party is a rarity, and often there are 2-3 in a weekend…

We’ve learnt a lot about what makes a great party, and we’ve delivered a lot of great parties, so here’s some things that make a party work.

Ice breakers.  These are important, not everyone is going to know each other.  Some kids are going to be shy and have trouble engaging with the group at first.  Our parties are very physical and we start each one with a big balloon battle as the kids are coming in.  By the time we get started everyone should hopefully be having fun and moving around.

Structure and organization are key, but it shouldn’t feel that way to the participants.  Down time is the enemy of anyone in charge of a group of excited kids.  If they have nothing to do, they find something to do and then getting the group back as a group becomes a task.  One thing should go to the next quickly and smoothly with pacing to match.  They can’t all be going 100% for a hour straight, they’ll burn out. And if anything goes on too long they will lose interest.  From the time they walk in the door to the time they get picked up, there should be something going on.  Little things matter too, for example when we do a piniata it happens before present opening, not after.  Why?  Because while the birthday kid is opening presents they have their loot to keep them occupied.

Something for everyone.  There are some kids that have a hard time with a big group, anxiety or shyness makes engaging with the group hard.  They might need to observe some parts, but some parts should be set up to get them involved.  Our big group games can be intimidating for a few, but often a one-on-one foam sword battle will get them in the ring.

Cool stuff matters.  Part of a great party is making it a special occasion for the birthday child.  Letting them do a little extra, having them battle all of their friends.  Having them cut their cake with a full sized sword.  Having them smash a piniata with a wooden sword (which they get to take home as a souvenir).  Having them demonstrate all the drills and games.  It’s their birthday, and their day to feel special and get the photo ops in.

If you want more information on our birthday parties visit this page: http://www.innovativema.ca/school-info/birthday-parties/

 

The Most Important Experience…

One thing I’ve noticed lately is a some parents want to give their kid a wide range of experiences.  Trying a little of everything to see what they like.  This is awesome, kids should experience as much as they can without getting overloaded.

But one thing to be careful of is skipping a very important experience, and that is seeing things through.  Learning what it takes to not just taste a skill, but to get good at it.

Whether it is music, dance, martial arts or pretty much anything.  Most people are, at some point, going to think about and possibly want to quit.

You start something, you get real excited about doing something new and it’s great… but pretty much everyone in anything is going to have a point where they want to stop.

It makes sense, we go through stages in learning.  And different people have a hard time with different stages.

For a lot of people, getting started in the first place is the hardest thing.  That first trip through the door.  If all you do is sample different activities you might get good at starting things, and that is a good skill to have.  But learning to coup with the other stages is just as important.

Once you get started you quickly realize how much you don’t know and how hard it all is at first.  (Conscious incompetence in the 4 stages of learning).  This is the second hurdle to get over.  Showing up and learning a skill, even when it is not going well.  We start playing a instrument with a vision of playing well, or start martial arts with a vision of being able to pull things off.  But it’s hard, it takes time, and in the beginning… everyone doesn’t know what they are doing.

If you can get past the second stage you get to where you know what you are doing, but it doesn’t yet come naturally.  You have to think about it and be deliberate.  (conscious competence) .  At this stage there is a lot of repetition, It’s not as much learning new things as it is making things you know instinct and second nature.   The repetition and frustration with making mistakes when your brain tells you that you know better can get the better of you here.

And finally, you get to where things flow.  Where you can pick up a instrument and freestyle, where you can wrestle and move well instinctively.  Where the real joy of the skill kicks in and creativity and the “art” side of it comes out.  At this stage, for those that make it.  Quitting is a lot less common, it becomes a part of you.

That is a experience worth having, taking a skill to the point of unconscious competence.  No one regrets getting to this stage, but a lot of people wish they had.  The number of people that will say they wished they had kept at playing guitar, or kept at martial arts, or stuck with painting is a very high number.  But finding someone that says “I wish I’d been able to quit years ago when I wanted to” is a lot harder.

A short introduction to something is a good experience, taking a skill to the point of unconscious competence, where it becomes instinct and creativity… that is a truly amazing experience and one worth more then any number of introduction to _____’s.  Give your kids the experience of “Mastery”, and the process of reaching it.  It’s not easy, but it’s worth it.

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Types of Martial Arts for Children





One thing that I think often confuses people that are not involved in the martial arts is how much variety there is to it. Martial arts have as much variety to them as team sports do, and different forms of martial arts can be as different as hockey and baseball.

So that said I want to break down a few of the more common forms of martial arts and what they involve.

Karate: Karate is a form of martial arts that comes out of Japan
/ Okinawa, even within “karate” there is a fair bit of variety between different branches. Modern karate generally involves forms practice (preset routines), self-defence and a type of lower contact kickboxing. It tends to be fairly regimented, and a times resembling military drill. Karate gained popularity for kids in the 80′s due largely to the “Karate Kid” movie.Karate-kids

Tae Kwon Do: This is very similar to karate, with a focus more heavy on kicks. Tae Kwon Do has it’s organs in Karate and was marketed as “Korean Karate” by a lot of schools. Tae Kwon Do has become very popular with school age kids and is an Olympic sport.200-kids-confirm-for-ccsf-taekwondo-opens-jpg-e1448888369700

Judo: Judo is a Japanese style done in a “gi” or uniform that is designed to be grabbed. The primary focus is throwing your opponent and having them land on their back. With secondary emphasis on pinning and submitting your opponent through arm locks and chokes.Judo+kids

Kung Fu: Similar to Karate and Tae Kwon Do, however of Chinese origin. Kung Fu heavily influenced the development of Karate. Kung Fu has a huge variety in it’s styles, from direct and to the point to flashy and acrobatic.san-jose-kids-kung-fu-class-suns-kung-fu-academy-31

Boxing:  Boxing is a western martial art, an olympic sport, and something most people are familiar with, however it often is not thought of as a martial art. Competitive boxing is frequently under fire for head trauma, but lower / no contact gyms have been become a major player in fitness.7.1.10ChildBoxingByLuigiNovi1

Kickboxing / Muay Thai: Similar to boxing, in competition they get a bad rep for head trauma and other injuries. Western Kickboxing was largely about combining boxing with Karate, where as Muay Thai is a sport originating in Thailand using not only punches and kicks, but knees and elbows as well.maxresdefault

Wrestling: Wrestling, (“real” wrestling, not the WWE form) is a hugely popular sport worldwide. Wrestling is one of the oldest sports in the world, is a part of the physical education program in a lot of places, and has been a part of nearly every culture in some form. Currently their are two styles of wrestling in the Olympics, Freestyle is the most practiced, especially amongst youth. The objective is to take down, or throw your opponent then pin their back to the floor.AR-140339940

Fencing: Sword fighting, another form with a long history that is a Olympic sport. Several forms of fencing exist, in the west Epee, sober and foil are used (these are the guys and gals in the white suits and mesh masks. In Japan “Kendo” uses “Shinai” (a bamboo representation of a katana) along with much heavier armour.Category-KendoForKids

AR-605062070JuJitsu: A Japanese style that emphasizes joint manipulation and chokes.  Jujitsu is more of a “traditional” style then Judo, which took the safer elements and used live training to create a sport version where techniques could be applied against full resistance.

Aikido: Aikido was the combination of a branch of Jujitsu with strong philosophical and religious beliefs surrounding pacifism and Chi / Ki energy.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: Based  in Judo, BJJ focuses more on the ground work aspect of the martial arts.  With less emphasis on throws and more on submissions. BJJ gained popularity in the 90′s the Gracie family dominated in No-Holds-Barred fights to promote their family style.  This culminated in the creation of the UFC.  BJJ has become a increasingly popular sport outside of full contact fights as well.Kids-BJJ-Tournament-4.18-41

Mixed Martial Arts: This is where our bias is going to kick in, as this is what we teach… Anyways, MMA has been around in some form as long as we have history to look at.  “Pankration” was the name used in Ancient Greece where it was an Olympic sport.  Modern MMA developed in parallel in multiple places (largely Brazil and Japan) as frustration with how many other forms where drifting away from practicality and becoming unable to deal with a full range of situations.  MMA basically means it combines aspects of all sorts of styles, to create something more inclusive.  Instead of training exclusively in striking training is done in striking & grappling.Screen Shot 2017-01-30 at 2.03.25 PM

So which style should your child do?  Well, as I said, I’m biased, but here’s my answer:

In most cases MMA.  Different kids will have different needs and things they hope to get out of training, and the same thing is not best for everyone.

But, MMA, despite it’s reputation as a professional sport is one of the safer options, and one that I think offers the most benefits in terms of building confidence in children.

In a striking art (karate / TaeKwonDo / etc) kids will learn to strike.  Perhaps some basic releases from grabs and things, but the majority of what they do is going to be around hitting another person.  If pinned they won’t have the tools to deal with that, and if getting hit their trained response will be to hit back.  In MMA they are taught to escape pins, and if someone is hitting them how to take that person down and control them.

MMA also has some safety benefits as well for kids.  Looking at grappling styles, Judo and wrestling both reward takedowns that hit the ground hard.  For us this doesn’t matter, a safer takedown that leaves good control is more valuable then a hard one that doesn’t.  Judo and wrestling both emphasis putting people on their back.  And in fact landing on your back is the safest way to fall, it is trained in both.  Except in practice the safest way to fall costs points or even the match, so rather then land safe participants often try to land in ways that keep them off their back which can result in injuries.

We also have the benefit of a larger set of curriculum, keeping people learning new things for a very, very long time.  With this comes a lot more freedom for personalization.

The huge range of things also allows a lot more safety persuasions to be put in place at carrying levels and ages.  Kids in our school do not hit the head, they don’t push to the head, they don’t kick to the head, it just doesn’t happen.  Removing head shots in a sport like boxing or Tae Kwon Do is a lot harder as it is a large chunk of the style.

Hope that helps :)

Iceland knows how to stop teen substance abuse but the rest of the world isn’t listening

It’s really basic stuff, but easy to forget. Teens need a place to belong, and something to belong too. And there is a period in there where it’s sometimes hard to fine. If they don’t find it in a productive and healthy place, it’s easy to find in a unhealthy place.

Kids hit a age where they feel they should be more independent then they are able too, where there is a gap in between being a “kid” and being able to work and gain independence. I think the best thing that can be done at this age is to keep them involved in something outside of school and to help them find a way to feel they bring value to something.

https://mosaicscience.com/story/iceland-prevent-teen-substance-abuse